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Spring 2024
Feb 27, 2024
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Information Select the Course Number to get further detail on the course. Select the desired Schedule Type to find available classes for the course. The Schedule Type links will be available only when the schedule of classes is available for the selected term.

SFS 21000 - Small Farm Experience I
Credit Hours: 3.00. This is the first course of two designed to help students gain an understanding of what is needed to establish a productive small farm enterprise. There will be short field trips to local small farming enterprises. Classes will also be taught by guest lecturers and local farmers who have been successful at establishing small farming enterprises. Students in the class will be responsible for working on the Purdue Student Farm to gain practical experience on the topics and concepts being taught in the class.
0.000 OR 3.000 Credit hours

Syllabus Available
Levels: Graduate, Professional, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Distance Learning, Laboratory, Lecture
All Sections for this Course

Offered By: College of Agriculture
Department: Hort & Landscape Architecture

Course Attributes:
Lower Division

May be offered at any of the following campuses:     
      West Lafayette

Learning Outcomes: 1. Develop a broader appreciation of the range of agricultural enterprises that are feasible in the Midwest. 2. Lean and experience a range of skills pertaining to small farm management. 3. Improve ability to design, market, and operate a small farming business.


SFS 21100 - Small Farm Experience II
Credit Hours: 3.00. This course is a continuation of SFS 21000 and is designed to help students gain an understanding of what is needed to establish a productive small farm enterprise. There will be short field trips to local small farming enterprises. Classes will also be taught by guest lecturers and local farmers who have been successful at establishing small farming enterprises. Students in the class will be responsible for working on the Purdue Student Farm to gain practical experience on the topics and concepts being taught in the class.
0.000 OR 3.000 Credit hours

Syllabus Available
Levels: Graduate, Professional, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Distance Learning, Laboratory, Lecture

Offered By: College of Agriculture
Department: Hort & Landscape Architecture

Course Attributes:
Lower Division

May be offered at any of the following campuses:     
      West Lafayette

Learning Outcomes: 1. Develop a broader appreciation of the range of agricultural enterprises that are feasible in the Midwest. 2. Lean and experience a range of skills pertaining to small farm management. 3. Improve ability to design, market, and operate a small farming business.


SFS 30100 - Agroecology
Credit Hours: 3.00. This course introduces students to the application of ecological concepts to food production systems and farm management. We will consider species interactions, nutrient and water cycles, regenerative practices, alternative approaches to agriculture, and ecosystem services provided to and by agro-ecosystems.
3.000 Credit hours

Syllabus Available
Levels: Graduate, Professional, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Distance Learning, Lecture

Offered By: College of Agriculture
Department: Hort & Landscape Architecture

Course Attributes:
Upper Division

May be offered at any of the following campuses:     
      West Lafayette

Learning Outcomes: 1. Understand key connections between ecology and agriculture. 2. Apply the agro-ecosystem concept to farming systems. 3. Discuss the relative strengths and weaknesses of conventional and alternative forms of agriculture. 4. Understand the effect of farm management practices on primary productivity, nutrient cycling, and species interaction. 5. Evaluate ecosystem services provided to and by agro-ecosystems. 6. Consider the role of social factors on farming systems. 7. Discuss the potential for ecologically based agriculture to address farming issues at local, regional, and global levels.


SFS 30200 - Principles Of Sustainability
Credit Hours: 3.00. Principles of sustainability is an experiential (discussion/debate) course that delivers an expansive overview of the principles of sustainability as they relate to energy and resources, communities, and agriculture. Students will learn to understand and analyze different food and farming systems and how they relate to environmental, economic and social sustainability.
3.000 Credit hours

Syllabus Available
Levels: Graduate, Professional, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Distance Learning, Lecture

Offered By: College of Agriculture
Department: Hort & Landscape Architecture

Course Attributes:
Justice-Eqty-Divrsty-Inclusion, Upper Division

May be offered at any of the following campuses:     
      West Lafayette

Learning Outcomes: 1. Know the global carbon cycle and understand the greenhouse effect. 2. Understand the concepts of the individual, populations, communities, ecosystems and biomes. 3. Understand the ecological processes of vegetation succession. 4. Understand the role of crop rotations, cover crops and other land management methods. 5. Understand the pathways of nutrient cycling in the soil and the biosphere; e.g. N, P, C cycles. 6. Have a broad understanding of the principles of sustainability, including agricultural sustainability. 7. Understand the importance of energy in society and in agricultural production systems. 8. Understand the importance of natural resources in society and in agricultural production, and the principles of their conservation. 9. Have a broad awareness of the role of agriculture in global society. 10. Understand the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches to food production. 11. Understand the principles of food marketing and sales. 12. Be able to communicate effectively verbally, including being able to prepare and deliver effective scientific papers and presentations. 13. Be able to perform, analyze and discuss supervised experiments. 14. Be able to conduct a competent literature search, including a search for primary literature, and also including the ability to find and assimilate information that will broaden understanding of subject areas by accessing material that is not specifically taught in class. 15. Be able to handle multiple tasks and deadline pressures. 16. Be able to work effectively with individuals from diverse cultures. 17. Have strong professional ethics and integrity. 18. Understand the importance of developing leadership skills. 19. Be able to work effectively in teams.


SFS 31100 - Aquaponics
Credit Hours: 1.00. (FNR 31300) (HORT 31110) There has been a significant renewed interest in the investigation of integrated fish-food plant systems. Such systems have a long and rich history, particularly in Asia; and our impending food crisis has kindled an interest in developing aquaponic systems in western countries. Many growers are turning to controlled environment and hydroponic production methods to produce high-value crops in tight quarters. The waste disposal problem of the fish can become the nutrient supply to the plants.
1.000 Credit hours

Syllabus Available
Levels: Graduate, Professional, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Distance Learning, Lecture

Offered By: College of Agriculture
Department: Hort & Landscape Architecture

Course Attributes:
Upper Division

May be offered at any of the following campuses:     
      West Lafayette

Learning Outcomes: 1. Understand the nature of interactions among organisms, in particular those involving plants: mutualism, commensalism, parasitism, herbivory. 2. Understand the relationships among host, environment and pathogen for development of plant disease. 3. Know principal pathogens of Midwestern crops. 4. Understand the pathways of nutrient cycling in the soil and the biosphere; e.g. N, P, C cycles. 5. Have a broad understanding of the principles of sustainability, including agricultural sustainability. 6. Understand the importance of energy in society and in agricultural production systems. 7. Understand the importance of natural resources in society and in agricultural production, and the principles of their conservation. 8. Have a broad awareness of the role of agriculture in global society. 9. Understand the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches to food production. 10. Understand the principles of food marketing and sales. 11. Understand the principles of post harvest food storage and pest management.


SFS 31200 - Urban Agriculture
Credit Hours: 1.00. Urban agriculture has the potential to address a range of social, economic and environmental issues including food insecurity, energy conservation, and human health and well-being. During this 5-week course, students will learn about the forces driving urban agriculture as well as the political and biophysical factors constraining it by reading articles, reviewing case studies, and visiting urban farms, vertical farm factories, food pantries, and local food advocacy groups. At the end of this course, students will apply the knowledge they've gained by developing a plan to increase urban agriculture in the greater Lafayette metropolitan area.
1.000 Credit hours

Syllabus Available
Levels: Graduate, Professional, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Distance Learning, Lecture

Offered By: College of Agriculture
Department: Hort & Landscape Architecture

Course Attributes:
Upper Division

May be offered at any of the following campuses:     
      West Lafayette

Learning Outcomes: 1. Understand the complexity of our global food system and learn how urban agriculture can address social, economic and ecological issues in cities around the world. 2. Develop critical thinking and communication skills through in-class discussions and writing assignments that integrate agroecology, urban planning, and civic engagement as they relate to urban agriculture. 3. Apply relevant theories and examples by developing a plan to facilitate the growth of urban agriculture.


SFS 31300 - Farm To Fork
Credit Hours: 1.00. This course will investigate the culinary opportunities of local and seasonal foods and the horticultural demands of producing and marketing them. Dr. Hallett will represent the "farm", giving students a brief overview of the production of local and seasonal foods in Indiana. The "farm" will harvest produce at the student farm and deliver it to the "fork" - Chef Ambarish Lulay - who will work his culinary magic in the teaching kitchens in the HTM department. The focus, from both "sides" of the course will be the importance of niche marketing for farmers and chefs. This course is going to be tasty and fun!
1.000 Credit hours

Syllabus Available
Levels: Graduate, Professional, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Distance Learning, Lecture

Offered By: College of Agriculture
Department: Hort & Landscape Architecture

Course Attributes:
Upper Division

May be offered at any of the following campuses:     
      West Lafayette

Learning Outcomes: 1. Have a broad understanding of the principles of sustainability, including agricultural sustainability. 2. Have a broad awareness of the role of agriculture in global society. 3. Understand the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches to food production. 4. Understand the principles of food marketing and sales. 5. Understand the principles of postharvest food storage and pest management. 6. Be able to handle multiple tasks and deadline pressures. 7. Be able to work effectively with individuals from diverse cultures. 8. Have strong professional ethics and integrity. 9. Understand the importance of developing leadership skills. 10. Be able to work effectively in teams.


SFS 31400 - Comparative Livestock Production Systems
Credit Hours: 1.00. This course will compare and contrast the various livestock and poultry systems in the United States. The course will begin with in depth analysis of the history and structure of prevalent or conventional livestock and poultry production systems followed by a similar analysis of the various alternative production systems currently in use in the US, including organic, grass-fed, and pasture-raised among others. A heavy focus will be placed on critically evaluating the pros and cons of each system, regulations of both conventional and process-verified systems and potential differences in products resulting from different management and processing systems.
1.000 Credit hours

Syllabus Available
Levels: Graduate, Professional, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Distance Learning, Lecture

Offered By: College of Agriculture
Department: Hort & Landscape Architecture

Course Attributes:
Upper Division

May be offered at any of the following campuses:     
      West Lafayette

Learning Outcomes: 1. Understand the structure of conventional livestock and poultry production systems in the US. 2. Understand the alternative livestock and poultry production systems prevalent in the US. 3. Know how each system is regulated including the various process verified systems. 4. Know how different management and processing systems do or do not impact final product qualities. 5. Be able to critically evaluate and compare the benefits and challenges inherent in different production systems.


SFS 31500 - Principles Of Permaculture
Credit Hours: 1.00. The goal of this class is to encourage students to think of farming systems, including their energy and resource flows, economics and social characteristics, in the ways that ecologists think of ecological systems. How does energy flow through farming systems, and how do resources recycle (or not)? What are the weaknesses of farming systems that could be mitigated by mimicking natural systems? Issues of efficiency, sustainability and resilience will be investigated in the context of permaculture, a theory of food production and landscape design that has an emphasis on perennial crops, low input production, and ecological diversity. The centerpiece of the course will be to further develop the Purdue Student Farm using permaculture principles.
1.000 Credit hours

Syllabus Available
Levels: Graduate, Professional, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Distance Learning, Lecture

Offered By: College of Agriculture
Department: Hort & Landscape Architecture

Course Attributes:
Upper Division

May be offered at any of the following campuses:     
      West Lafayette

Learning Outcomes: 1. Analyze energy and natural resource issues of modern society in the context of ecological systems thinking.


SFS 35100 - SFS Capstone Project
Credit Hours: 1.00. The SFS Capstone Project is a directed-learning course that will require students to prepare and present a sustainability analysis of a farm enterprise, most likely the enterprise at which they conduct their required summer internship, and this may be an internship approved at an operation other than a farm. Students will be required to analyze and enterprise taking into account its economic, environmental and social sustainability, and its broader role in sustaining the local and regional economy, environment and community. The analysis will be prepared as a paper and a presentation that will be given to the undergraduates of the SFS program at an SFS program meeting. The paper and the presentation will be prepared in consultation with a faculty mentor from the SFS program committee and will be graded by the faculty mentor. Completion of an approved work or internship experience.
1.000 Credit hours

Syllabus Available
Levels: Graduate, Professional, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Distance Learning, Individual Study

Offered By: College of Agriculture
Department: Hort & Landscape Architecture

Course Attributes:
Upper Division

May be offered at any of the following campuses:     
      West Lafayette

Learning Outcomes: 1. Analyze complex concepts. 2. Think critically about systems and business operations from a range of different economic and social contexts. 3. Develop written and oral communication skills.


SFS 39100 - Special Problems In Sustainable Food And Farming Systems
Credit Hours: 1.00 to 3.00. Contemporary topics in sustainable food and farming systems are explored. Topic selection is based on student interest. Permission of instructor required.
0.000 TO 3.000 Credit hours

Syllabus Available
Levels: Graduate, Professional, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Distance Learning, Individual Study, Laboratory, Lecture, Presentation, Recitation
All Sections for this Course

Offered By: College of Agriculture
Department: Hort & Landscape Architecture

Course Attributes:
Dept Credit, Upper Division, Variable Title

May be offered at any of the following campuses:     
      West Lafayette

Repeatable for Additional Credit: Yes - May be repeated an unlimited number of times

Learning Outcomes: 1. Communicate effectively verbally, including being able to prepare and deliver effective scientific papers and presentations. 2. Conduct a competent literature search, including a search for primary literature, and also including the ability to find and assimilate information that will broaden understanding of subject areas by accessing material that is not specifically taught in class. 3. Develop an understanding of and be able to practice the scientific method of investigation. 4. Handle multiple tasks and deadlines. 5. Have a strong professional ethics and integrity. 6. Have a working knowledge of SI (metric ) units.


SFS 41100 - Structural Racism In US Agriculture
Credit Hours: 1.00. A discussion-based exploration of the history and legacies of structural racism in American agriculture. We will analyze the barriers to success faced by non-white farmers in the US, the structures that have oppressed minority groups in agriculture, and ways in which these forces might be reversed or resisted.
1.000 Credit hours

Syllabus Available
Levels: Graduate, Professional, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Distance Learning, Lecture

Offered By: College of Agriculture
Department: Hort & Landscape Architecture

Course Attributes:
Justice-Eqty-Divrsty-Inclusion, Upper Division

May be offered at any of the following campuses:     
      West Lafayette

Learning Outcomes: 1. Deepen an understanding of racism, bias, and white privilege. 2. Develop an understanding of the governmental, institutional, and social structures that have led to racial and ethnic inequities in American agriculture. 3. Understand the relationship of all peoples with American agriculture, whether indigenous or arriving as enslaved person or immigrant, and the legacies of those relationships. 4. Analyze the ways in which immigration and foreign policy impact the US food system. 5. Learn to communicate issues of structural racism in American agriculture effectively. 6. Construct ideas that might promote a more equitable food system.


SFS 41200 - Colonialism, Globalization, And Food Justice
Credit Hours: 1.00. This course will uncover the foundations of inequities in access to healthy, nutritious food from the first era of colonization to the modern era of globalization. The course will make students aware of the racial and ethnic inequities in farming and food systems and consider mechanisms of decolonization: resistance against the status quo and the development of new food systems.
1.000 Credit hours

Syllabus Available
Levels: Graduate, Professional, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Distance Learning, Lecture

Offered By: College of Agriculture
Department: Hort & Landscape Architecture

Course Attributes:
Justice-Eqty-Divrsty-Inclusion, Upper Division

May be offered at any of the following campuses:     
      West Lafayette

Learning Outcomes: 1. Understand the emergence of modern food systems through the eras of colonization and globalization. 2. Analyze the factors that contribute to inequities in access to healthy, nutritious food. 3. Investigate global and local food justice movements. 4. Evaluate the legacies of colonialism in today's food deserts. 5. Investigate local food movements, such as urban agriculture, represent attempts at decolonization. 6. Investigate the activism of indigenous groups around the world seeking decolonization and food justice. 7. Consider policies to reduce inequities in food systems.


SFS 41300 - The Cultures And Agricultures Of The United States
Credit Hours: 1.00. The United States is a vast country encompassing many climates, geographies, and human histories. This course will investigate the diversity of the United States by examining a dozen locations with respect to people-and-place. How have people shaped these places, and how have these places shaped the people who have lived in them?
1.000 Credit hours

Syllabus Available
Levels: Graduate, Professional, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Distance Learning, Lecture

Offered By: College of Agriculture
Department: Hort & Landscape Architecture

Course Attributes:
Justice-Eqty-Divrsty-Inclusion, Upper Division

May be offered at any of the following campuses:     
      West Lafayette

Learning Outcomes: 1. Understand the different types of land use, especially agriculture, in different regions of the United States, and consider their sustainability. 2. Investigate the cultures and agricultures of American Indian tribes prior to first contact with Europeans. 3. Analyze the displacement and relocation of American Indian tribes in specific regions. 4. Analyze the nature and legacies of slavery, and the means by which African Americans have been excluded from land ownership since reconstruction. 5. Consider the contributions of Asian Americans to the cultures and agricultures of the United States. 6. Investigate changes to the natural, built, and cultural landscapes of the United States through time. 7. Consider how the sustainability of cultures, economies, environmental health, and agriculture can (or cannot) be sustained in different regions of the United States.


SFS 48500 - Environmental Communication
Credit Hours: 3.00. This is an interactive course in science and environmental communication with a strong emphasis on development of practical writing and communication skills for students who will become professionals in environment or natural resources. The public primarily obtains environmental information through the media, as such, scientists need to develop the understanding and skills necessary to engage with a range of audiences through the design of effective communication products. This course provides a unique balance of communication theory and skills training in which students develop the confidence to meaningfully communicate environmental issues. Permission of instructor required if not Junior or Senior standing.
3.000 Credit hours

Syllabus Available
Levels: Graduate, Professional, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Distance Learning, Lecture

Offered By: College of Agriculture
Department: Hort & Landscape Architecture

Course Attributes:
Upper Division

May be offered at any of the following campuses:     
      West Lafayette

Learning Outcomes: 1. Develop a working understanding of the practical fundamentals of communicating complex environmental science to non-technical and technical audiences. 2. Apply foundational communication theory across a range of writing forms including academic writing form, explanatory short-form, poetry, white papers, and TED talks. 3. Analyze book-length environmental nonfiction to identify effective writing techniques and strategies. 4. Investigate strategies used in environmental and nature writing in poetry and fiction to engage audiences and write compelling science stories. 5. Understand key elements of human nature (information processing, risk perceptions, social norms, etc.) that are contributing to environmental controversy and apply that knowledge in strategic design of communication products.



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